Has Buy to Let Shackled First Time Buyers?

                  Has Buy to Let Shackled First Time Buyers?

Research has shown that over the last decade, literally tens of thousands of new investors bought dwellings to let out.

A growing population and rising living standards drove up housing demand. Experts say that the imbalance has benefited investors in the long term by lowering vacancy risk and raising their capital gains. Read more

Generation Rent!

                                                        Generation Rent!

Owning a home is considered to be something to aspire to, but a recent survey showed that only a third of first time buyers believe that opportunities for them are set to improve in the future.

 As affordability and mortgage constraints continue to take hold, so does home ownership, for many it remains little more than a long-held dream. Read more

First Time Buyers Moving Back in With Parents.

                    First Time Buyers Moving Back in With Parents.

Recent research has shown that around 90 per cent of British adults wish to own their own home, however at present; only 70 per cent are able to do so.

The Council of Mortgage Lenders (CML) recently published some data that showed aspirations to own a home are much higher than current home ownership levels among those aged under 35. Read more

Why is Buying Better Than Renting?

                     Why is Buying Better Than Renting?

Many recent reports have shown that despite differences in rents and house prices across the country, buying a home anywhere will save money in the long run.

It appears that rents are now so out of touch with wages that some families are spending over half of their income just to keep a roof over their head. Rents now make up a third of people’s earnings across England leaving even less for other essentials such as food and fuel.  Read more

The ‘Bank of Mum and Dad’ to the Rescue!

The ‘Bank of Mum and Dad’ to the Rescue!

The situation for first time buyers has been extremely difficult especially since the banking crisis first took hold over four years ago.

Before the banking crisis, most people who wanted a mortgage could get one with a 100 per cent loan to value (LTV) ratio, meaning they did not have to save up much of a deposit. Read more